The Anti-Corruption Report

The definitive source of actionable intelligence covering anti-corruption laws around the globe

Articles By Topic

By Topic: Italian Anti-Corruption Law

  • From Vol. 7 No.1 (Jan. 10, 2018)

    What Multinationals Need to Know About Italy’s New Whistleblowing Provisions

    The Italian Parliament recently passed a bill extending the duty to adopt a whistleblowing system to companies implementing a Law 231 model, the compliance model that companies operating in Italy adopt to avoid liability for corruption and other corporate crimes. In a guest article, Roberto Cursano, partner at the Studio Professionale Associato of Baker & McKenzie located in Rome, comments on the characteristics of this bill, passed on November 15, 2017, and advises companies on how to update their compliance program to comply with it. See “Regional Risk Spotlight: Baker & McKenzie Lawyers Discuss Italy’s Corruption Risks and Unique Compliance Model” (Apr. 20, 2016). 

    Read Full Article …
  • From Vol. 5 No.21 (Oct. 26, 2016)

    Lynch’s Visit to Italy Highlights International Cooperation and Enforcement

    On October 20, 2016, U.S. Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch and Italian Minister of Justice Andrea Orlando hosted a meeting about international cooperation in the fight against organized crime and corruption. The meeting focused on the recent achievements and future developments of the collaboration between the U.S. and the Italian governments in the judicial field. In a guest article, Italian lawyers Roberto Cursano and Riccardo Ovidi, counsel and associate at Studio Professionale Associato at Baker & McKenzie discuss the key takeaways from the meeting, arguing that the meeting’s focus on collaboration confirms that companies should take into account the transnational dimension of anti-corruption enforcement when formulating their compliance programs. See “The Italian Organismo di Vigilanza, A Model for an Effective Compliance Committee” (Jun.15, 2016).

    Read Full Article …
  • From Vol. 5 No.12 (Jun. 15, 2016)

    The Italian Organismo di Vigilanza, A Model for an Effective Compliance Committee

    As anti-corruption enforcement continues to expand around the globe, companies have much to learn from the way organizations operating in other regions approach compliance. In Italy, companies can avoid anti-corruption liability by adopting effective compliance standards and controls including a compliance committee called an Organismo di Vigilanza. According to the best practices and guidelines issued by relevant industry associations, a company’s Organismo di Vigilanza, in combination with company leadership, should be responsible for the supervision of the company’s compliance program, preventing prohibited behaviors and for reviews, updates and training. In a guest article, Aurelio Giovannelli and Roberto Cursano – partner and counsel, respectively, at Baker & McKenzie’s Studio Professionale Associato in Rome – discuss the laws governing the Organismo di Vigilanza and how to form such a committee. See also “Regional Risk Spotlight: Baker & McKenzie Lawyers Discuss Italy’s Corruption Risks and Unique Compliance Model” (Apr. 20, 2016). 

    Read Full Article …
  • From Vol. 5 No.8 (Apr. 20, 2016)

    Regional Risk Spotlight: Baker & McKenzie Lawyers Discuss Italy’s Corruption Risks and Unique Compliance Model 

    There is a growing trend, particularly in European countries, of implementing laws that outline the best practices for an anti-corruption compliance program and then allow a company to assert their effective compliance program as a defense to anti-corruption violations. Italy – a country riddled by corruption scandals, most publicly during the tenure of Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi – has recently introduced an innovative set of laws that takes these proscriptive best practices a step further, particularly with regard to monitoring compliance programs. The FCPA Report recently spoke with Roberto Cursano and Aurelio Giovannelli of the Studio Professionale Associato of Baker & McKenzie located in Rome about the state of anti-corruption compliance in Italy. See previously “Analyzing Spain’s New Corporate Compliance Defense” (Apr. 6, 2016).

    Read Full Article …